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Scripps Phytoplankton Camera

Our latest underwater imaging system, the Scripps Phytoplankton Camera (SPC-P), was deployed at the end of Scripps Pier on Sept 19, 2014 and has been running for several weeks collecting over 30,000 images per day. Click on the images below to visit the site:

SPCP-1412591972-001174-000-576-1896-472-216_0Jaffe_PierCam_pt3mmFOV-1

From the site:

The Scripps Phytoplankton Camera (SPC-P) was developed under a grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation and an anonymous donor to the Scripps Inst. of Oceanograpy, and in cooperation with the Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS). The SPC-P is an underwater darkfield microscope with real-time image processing and object detection. It was designed to detect objects from a few microns up to several millimeters. It employs darkfield illumination. Data from the SPC-P are transferred in real-time to a webserver and database that support an interactive web tool for browsing images and exploring image statistics.

Scripps Plankton Camera

Our latest underwater imaging system, the Scripps Plankton Camera, was deployed at the end of Scripps Pier on March 14 and has been running for more than a month now collecting over 4 million images. Click on the image below to visit the site:

copepodSPC

From the Site:

The Scripps Plankton Camera (SPC) was developed under a grant from the Beyster Foundation and in cooperation with the Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS). The SPC is an underwater microscope with real-time image processing and object detection. It was designed to detect objects from tens of microns up to several centimeters. It employs darkfield illumination to enhance contrast of transparent objects. Data from the SPC are transfered in real-time to a webserver and database that support and interactive web tool for browsing images and exploring image statistics.

First Deployment of Laser Imager Tow Sled

Last Friday we successfully deployed our tow platform for our new laser imaging system. The sled performance was very good and we were able to tow it reliably very close to the bottom with great altitude-keeping performance. In the video below, there is a nice example of strong changes in water color and clarity as the sled descends from the surface down to 50 m. Towards the end of the video note the high abundance of jellies zipping by the sled as it moves through the water at 3.5 knots.

Recording of a Whale Swimming by an Array of AUEs

While deploying 6 of our AUEs on a stereo recording rig at 16m depth, we happened to capture a whale swimming near the surface above the AUEs. Tristan Hiatt processed the acoustic data from the AUEs into a great stereo track and overlayed it on a video of the event recorded from the boat. Have a look and listen below, you’ll see and hear the whale coming to the surface. It’s best with headphones!

Measurement system for marine animal reflectance functions

The journal article “Measurement system for marine animal reflectance functions” by Justin M. Haag, Jules S. Jaffe, and Alison M. Sweeney has been recently published in Optics Express. This paper presents details of the optical instrument design and calibration for a new version of the OSMAR (optical scatterometer for measurement of angular reflectance) system that was described last year. Also included, are scattering patterns for squid and fish species that show interesting similarities in light scatter from two otherwise quite different animals. The physical explanations and potential ecological implications of the observed scattering from these species, as well as from others not yet presented, is a subject of future work.